Building A Home While Keeping Costs Down

While building a home can be great because of customization, sometimes costs can become high. There are ways to make sure the costs for a home are as low as possible. The following measure will help with keeping costs down when building a home.

When building a house, the contractor will play a major part in the cost of the home. No one should settle for the first contractor that they meet. Each contractor will offer different bids for their work, and if their prices don’t fit within a desired budget, then the contractor isn’t right for the job. It’s best to take multiple bids from different contractors and get references from their former customers. This will ensure that only the best people are working on the home and that they’ll keep costs from ballooning out of proportion.

A simple concept of building a home is that a larger home will cost more money. A larger home uses more materials and more work must be done to complete the home. The amount of people that will be living in the home will affect the size, and while an exceptionally small house may not work for everyone, people should at least try to build a home that is as large as the space they’ll actually need. Using a floor plan with an open design can make the most of the space inside the home without leaving everyone claustrophobic.

Aesthetic styles like rustic or industrial can keep costs down when building a home by being more flexible and forgiving. When these particular styles are used, certain areas of the home can remain unfinished and still look great in the home while playing with an overall theme. Smaller paint applications, unfinished wood on stairs, and even cinder block in kitchens set up a visual theme, and either use less expensive materials to accomplish, or use smaller amounts of existing materials to make the home complete. The thought of leaving things unfinished may seem odd, but when it all comes together, the look is quite remarkable.

If homeowners are willing to handle many of the building tasks themselves, the cost of building the home will be much lower. Some tasks are simple enough that even those without a background in construction can handle them. Sinks, toilets, and fixtures can be easily installed using information from books or the Internet. If contractors have already placed wiring inside the home, lighting can also be added. Tile and counter tops in kitchens can also be done by homeowners. While these things may take a little more time, and not all projects can be done without the help of a contractor, many can still be accomplished. Keeping this in mind, it’s best to leave pipe laying and wiring to those who are licensed to do it.

Finding out the source of many of the materials that will be used to build the home is a great cost saving option. Paint, lumber, and other similar items can be purchased in bulk by contractors and it will be hard to beat those prices. For other items, such as water heaters, it’s possible to find lower prices than what the contractor offers, and still have the contractor install them. Generally new items are the best option when sourcing, but cabinets and flooring can be bought second hand.

These cost saving measures will come in handy when it’s time to build a home.

There has been a more exciting time to be an Australian (it was last month, apparently)

On usurping the Prime Ministership last year, Malcolm Turnbull famously claimed:

“There has never been a more exciting time to be alive than today and there has never been a more exciting time to be an Australian.”

Malcolm Turnbull, 14 September 2015

Variations of the slogan quickly became part of the Liberal vernacular, but when the language worked its way into the Government’s National Innovation and Science Agenda, and the $28 million taxpayer-funded advertising campaign designed to sell it, the line between political slogan and statement of fact became dangerously blurred.

But they’re not so excited anymore.

The slogan, “There’s never been a more exciting time to be an Australian”, which featured prominently on the ideas boom website last month, has now all but disappeared – with only a manipulation of the site’s URL leading to the now discarded catch phrase.

Labor’s waste spokesperson, Pat Conroy, said the Government has questions to answer about the hidden slogan.

“I referred this advertising campaign to the Auditor General because I’m concerned it breaches the guidelines on Government advertising,” Mr Conroy said.

“When it launched, the slogan was plastered on the main page of the website as well as being the first line in the policy document. Since I referred it for audit, the slogan has been hidden from the website and there’s no navigation to it.”

“I suspect that somebody realised this is Malcolm Turnbull’s political slogan and removed it, either that or they’re just not excited anymore.”

“I have lodged Freedom of Information requests with the Prime Minister’s Department and the Industry Department to ascertain who directed that this slogan be removed, and whether it was done to avoid a breach of the advertising guidelines.”

“The Government have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on advertising in an election year and in this case they’ve blatantly repeated the PM’s tagline.”

“This isn’t an ideas boom, it’s a taxpayer funded advertising boom.”

Oops… J-Bish did it again!

J-Bish may throw her hands in the air like she just doesn’t care, but she should know her rock star antics are at a significant cost to the Australian public.

In answering Parliamentary Questions in Writing, the Foreign Minister has been forced to reveal her party posse swelled to more than a dozen during her 2014 tour of Western Australia with Canberra-based diplomats – which came in at a total cost of over $145,000 for the 3 day event.

Seven members of the Minister’s personal staff, along with five Departmental officers, were included in the Diplomatic Corps visit, which included a range of briefings, sight-seeing and fine dining occasions, as well as the obligatory koala cuddle that seems to take place during most of the Foreign Minister’s outings.

Labor’s Waste spokesperson, Pat Conroy, said J-Bish has a reputation for taking a large crew on tour with her.

“Last year we discovered Julie Bishop had spent $125,000 on a tour of South Australia, and on that occasion she took nine staff and a few State Liberal MPs along with her. We also caught her taking three staffers along to a $350 a head dinner, clearly more than are necessary,” Mr Conroy said.

“I am absolutely gobsmacked that Julie Bishop can justify taking a dozen staff members along with her on this trip. It’s excessive, what on earth were they all doing there?”

“I’m not suggesting Diplomacy isn’t important, and yes it’s long standing practice for Foreign Ministers to engage with foreign diplomats like this; but this tour included a $10,000 lunch at a winery and close to $60,000 on chartered flights, for example.”

“When the taxpayer is footing the bill for these functions, you’ve got to consider whether every additional expense is necessary.”

“It’s just unfathomable that the Minister would take so many of her own staff along. It looks like a free ride to me.”